Is Adam’s Car Shampoo biodegradable? (5 properties of Adam’s car shampoo) 

In this article, the biodegradability of Adam’s car shampoo will be discussed. The following topics will also be shed light on: 

  • What is Adam’s car shampoo?
  • What is the deal with car shampoos?
  • What materials are used to make car shampoos?
  • What materials are used in Adam’s car shampoo?
  • What is biodegradability?
  • What is the classification of waste based on biodegradability?
  • FAQs

Is Adam’s Car Shampoo biodegradable?

Adam’s car wash is made from biodegradable materials and hence, Adam’s car wash is biodegradable. 

It is also asserted that Adam’s car wash is designed to reduce the carbon footprint as well because Adam’s car wash usability is far greater than other companies’ car wash shampoos. 

A pint of Adam’s car wash is better than a gallon of other car wash shampoos in terms of car wash suds. 

What is Adam’s Car Shampoo? (5 properties of Adam’s car wash) 

Adam’s car shampoo is a liquid detergent that is used to wash and clean cars. Car shampoos have become an important necessity because as cities remain to get bigger, the increased distances make the ownership of cars a necessity rather than a luxury. 

Adams car shampoo is claimed to have a number of properties that gives it an edge over most of the available car shampoos. These include: 

  • Production of thicker suds
  • Neutrality of pH 
  • Sunlight insensitive 
  • May co-act with other products as well
  • Wildberry fragrance

These are some of the advantages offered by Adam’s car shampoo. Since it is pH neutral, it implies that there will be no damage to the skin. Many commercially available car shampoos are not pH neutral and there is an increased risk of skin diseases and issues, in case of contact.

Another advantage offered by Adam’s car shampoo is that it can be used in sunlight and will not undo the effects of other products. For example, if your car has any ceramic or other types of coating, then using Adam’s car shampoo will not compromise it in any way. 

Adam’s car shampoo comes with a relaxing and attractive fragrance that gives another important utilitarian edge to Adam’s car shampoo. 

What is the deal with car shampoos?

Some years back, the situation was a lot different. Cities were comparatively smaller and people mostly relied on options such as bicycles or walking to travel within cities. The use of cars was mostly reserved for inter-cities travel when large distances had to be covered. 

However, with increased urbanisation, more people shifted to cities which led to the expansion and growth of urban setups. This led to an increase in the ownership of vehicles because people needed a fast way of commuting. 

This led to increased and burgeoning demands and the use of vehicles. Today, every middle-class and upper-class person sees cars as an important necessity without which the quality of life will be compromised. 

Just as with every other material, cars also need to be cleaned and glossed. This is where car shampoos enter the picture. It is also important to know and ensure that car shampoos cause no major harm to the environment because the number of cars is so great. 

As per statistical findings, the number of cars used globally exceeds more than 1.5 billion cars. This figure, however, will be different in the case of different societies. For example, developed countries will have more cars as compared to developing countries. Regardless, these stats are enough to give a good idea of the scenario. 

If there are negative impacts of the use of car shampoos on the environment and the people, then it would mean that these effects would be really fervent given the number of cars used today. 

Car Shampoos are mostly made from surfactants. The major quality of surfactants that make them widely used is the fact that there are two parts to a surfactant. One part is attached to water and the other part is attached to dirt. 

It is a result of this quality that surfactants are successful in the removal of dirt and stains from cars while restoring the original shine of the car. 

What materials are used to make car shampoos?

The most important part of car shampoos is the surfactants used. Surfactants are the main ingredient that delivers the utilitarian edge to car shampoos and as a result, we get clean and glossed cars. 

Surfactants are chemically made of hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts. The overall functioning of surfactants can be summed up in a few lines. The hydrophobic part makes a cover around the dust particles; whereas, the hydrophilic part adheres to the water. 

As a result, when water is applied, the lather that is washed away also has dirt particles bound with the hydrophobic part of surfactants. Typical examples of surfactants used in car shampoo include: 

  • Sodium laureth sulphate 
  • Sodium lauryl sulphate 
  • Ammonium laureth sulphate 
  • Ammonium lauryl sulphate 

These surfactants may be associated with some general classes of surfactants. These may be: 

  • Anionic surfactants 
  • Cationic surfactants
  • Amphoteric surfactants
  • Non-ionic surfactants

Other than these surfactants, car shampoos also contain preservatives and fragrances. Fragrances give a soothing and appealing scent to car shampoos whereas, preservatives are important in making sure that car shampoos can be used for a long span of time without any compromise on the quality and utility in any way. 

What materials are used in Adam’s car shampoo?

The producers of Adam’s car shampoo argue that the materials used to make their shampoos cause the least harm to the environment. 

The materials deliver good utilitarian value while also putting the environment at the least amount of risk. 

Like other car shampoos, Adam’s car shampoo is also made from a blend of lubricants, surfactants, fragrances, and preservatives. Although the exact ingredients are not unveiled by the producers, it is hinted that the materials are eco-friendly and also biodegradable. 

Adam’s car shampoo is typically made of common ingredients that include:

  • Surfactants such as SLS  (Sodium Lauryl Sulphate)
  • Water
  • Salts
  • Fragrances
  • Preservatives
  • Lubricants
  • Foaming agents

What is biodegradability?

Biodegradability can be explained as a process through which complex waste is broken down into simple waste. This conversion is brought about by the action of microbes. These microbes can be bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa, and yeast. 

These microbes break down complex waste into simpler materials so that these simple materials may become a part of nature again. Therefore, it can be said that biodegradability is nature’s way to ensure that there is no waste accumulation. 

This is important because if there is waste accumulation, there will be dirt and pollution everywhere. Imagine if there is no dustbin in your house and you have no place to dispose of your waste. 

What do you think will happen? Your house will get dirty, right? The same is the case with our planet earth. Biodegradability can be stated as nature’s dustbin, and if there is no dustbin, there will be dirt and pollution. 

Now, proceeding with the analogy, consider that you are not able to dispose of waste from your house for a hundred years. You may assume that not being able to do so simply means that your house will become unlivable. 

The same is the case if there is no biodegradability. No biodegradability means that waste accumulated will persist for many hundred years and this will make our Earth unlivable. It will steal the Earth’s capacity to sustain and support life, pushing all the species towards the vicinity of extinction. 

What is the classification of waste based on biodegradability?

Based on biodegradability, waste can be categorised into two classes. These are: 

  • Biodegradable waste 
  • Non-biodegradable waste

Biodegradable waste is the waste that can be degraded by the action of microbes. Examples of this waste may be food waste, animal waste, plant waste, crop waste, agricultural waste, manure, sewage et cetera. 

This waste will be degraded in a short span of time. From some days to a few months. In some cases, however, biodegradable waste may also take up to 3 years to degrade. As it is seen in the case of bioplastics. 

The other type of waste is non-biodegradable waste. This waste can not be degraded by the action of microbes because microbes are unable to break down the structure of non-biodegradable waste. As a result, this waste may persist in the environment for as long as a thousand years. 

Examples of non-biodegradable waste may be a nuclear waste, hazardous waste, synthetic polymers, synthetic resins, synthetic textiles et cetera. 

Is Adam’s Car Shampoo biodegradable?

Based on the deliberations done until now, it can be postulated that: 

  • For a substance to be biodegradable, it must be made from natural materials that can be degraded by the action of microbes. 
  • Adam’s car shampoo is made from natural materials that will degrade by the action of microbes

Based on these two postulates, it can be finalised that Adam’s car shampoo is indeed biodegradable. Further, Adam’s car wash is designed as such to reduce the carbon footprint. 

It is claimed that a greater amount of car wash suds are produced by Adam’s car wash shampoo as compared to more than a gallon of other companies’ car wash. 

Conclusion 

It is concluded that Adam’s car wash is made from biodegradable materials and hence, Adam’s car wash is biodegradable. 

It is also asserted that Adam’s car wash is designed to reduce the carbon footprint as well because Adam’s car wash usability is far greater than other companies’ car wash shampoos. 

A pint of Adam’s car wash is better than a gallon of other car wash shampoos in terms of car wash suds. 

Frequently Asked Questions: Is Adam’s Car Shampoo biodegradable?

What is an example of surfactants used in car shampoos?

An example can be Sodium Lauryl Sulphate (SLS). SLS is biodegradable in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. 

Can car wash be toxic?

Yes, a number of products used in car wash may cause health complications. For example, hydrofluoric acid may be used in car washes which is highly toxic. 

References

  • Genuino, H. C., Opembe, N. N., Njagi, E. C., McClain, S., & Suib, S. L. (2012). A review of hydrofluoric acid and its use in the car wash industry. Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, 18(5), 1529-1539.
  • Hashim, N. H., & Zayadi, N. (2016). Pollutants characterization of car wash wastewater. In MATEC Web of Conferences (Vol. 47, p. 05008). EDP Sciences.
  • Perkowski, J., Bzdon, S., Bulska, A., & Jóźwiak, W. K. (2006). Decomposition of Detergents Present in Car-Wash Sewage by Titania Photo-Assisted Oxidation. Polish Journal of Environmental Studies, 15(3).
  • Hauthal, H. G. (2016). Types and typical ingredients of detergents. In Handbook Of Detergents, Part C (pp. 19-118). CRC Press.
  • Malinen, E., Id, N., Valtonen, S., Hakala, J., Mononen, T., & Kostia, S. (2012). Biological Treatment of Car Wash Waste Waters: A Reduction Survey. Linnaeus Eco-Tech.

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