How to Dispose of Turpenoid?

Turpenoid is a mineral spirit that is derived from crude petroleum. It is used as a paint thinner to clean oil painting brushes and thin out oil paints. Turpenoid is an odorless replacement for turpentine which is also a paint thinner, yet it is less and less preferred for cleaning brushes and other painting equipment due to its strong odor, flammability, and toxicity. 

There are many turpenoid in the market which claim to be less toxic than older paint thinners. Despite being less toxic and less volatile, turpenoid is still considered a toxic chemical by most municipalities and irresponsible disposal may harm the environment and humans. This is why it is imperative turpenoid is disposed of properly. This article will go over the proper disposal protocol for turpenoid and explain what should never be done to get rid of turpenoid. 

How to Dispose of Turpenoid?

For disposing of turpenoid you have two primary options, you can either hand it over to your local hazardous waste collection facility or you can dispose of it yourself by mixing it with cat litter. 

If you want to hand it over to a hazardous waste collection facility you need to first check if any pickup service is available in your area. Your municipality’s sanitation department will likely have information on this. 

Check out their website if they have any pickup service, if no such service is available you will have to hand over the chemical to them by yourself.

For any chemical you purchase, there is a materials safety data sheet that is available. You need to read that thoroughly before handling the chemical. Even if you are quite used to working with turpenoids, always make sure you read the safety and handling instructions that are written on the packaging. 

Keep your turpenoid in a cold, dry area, away from sunlight. 

Hand overused or unused turpenoid to your local hazardous waste facility: 

Different municipalities may have different protocols for what you need to do for a proper hand-over but the following tips are universal and you should make sure you meet all the criteria listed below. 

  • Seal the bottle cap tightly, turpenoid is very volatile and a loose cap may result in the liquid evaporating. 
  • Make sure you keep the original container the liquid came in. It is best to hand over chemicals in their original container since that has instructions on the type of chemical it is and how it should be handled. 
  • If the original container is broken, put it in a different air-tight container and make sure you label it properly for what chemical it is. Besides labeling the name, you must write down how you used the turpenoid and what other chemicals have been mixed into it. 

If there are no hazardous waste collection services in your area or the service does not accept turpentine alternatives like turpenoid, then you have to dispose of it yourself. 

Dispose of turpenoid at home: 

Turpenoid is far less dangerous than turpentine. It is less flammable and less toxic, but toxic nevertheless. If you have a very little amount of turpenoid leftover from your painting project, you can let it sit in a well-ventilated room for a few days until it evaporates. 

You need to make sure there are no pets or children who can reach the container of turpenoid. If there is paint mixed in with the turpenoid, you need to make sure you stir the mixture every so often to allow the liquid to evaporate faster. 

Once it’s completely dried off, mix the remaining paint with cat litter, shredded newspaper, or sawdust until all the liquids are absorbed. Then throw away the solid waste into the trash. 

If you have a larger amount of turpenoid and evaporation will take up a significant amount of time, then you can use cat litter to dry it out. 

Mix equal parts cat litter and turpenoid in a large container and mix briskly. 

Allow the clay to absorb the liquid completely, if necessary add more cat litter. Stir occasionally to make sure the liquid is fully absorbed. 

Once the waste is dry and crumbly and shows no signs of moisture you can put the litter in a bag and throw it in the trash. You can recycle the container where you did the mixing as well, just make sure the container is completely dry before you recycle it. 

How not to dispose of turpenoid: 

Turpenoid is safer than turpentine but it is still a hazard for the environment. Do not flush it down the toilet. You must not throw the bottle if turpentine into the trash as well. Do not pour it into the stormwater drain or pour it into the soil. 

Chemicals like turpenoid should not come in contact with the local vegetation or aquatic life. It is not compostable, recyclable, or biodegradable. It is a product made from fossil fuels so its use should be minimized. 

The best approach is to minimize waste: 

We are in a society that is far more environmentally conscious now than we were ever before. We understand and accept the dangers of wasting materials. If you are going to buy turpenoid for a painting project then try buying just the amount you need. 

If you find yourself with a surplus of turpenoid then try donating it first. This is the best way to get rid of unused turpenoid. See if there are any local art shops or hobby centers that may need extra turpenoid. Most of them will gladly appreciate the gesture. 

Conclusion:

There are many turpenoid in the market which claim to be less toxic than older paint thinners. Despite being less toxic and less volatile, turpenoid is still considered a toxic chemical by most municipalities and irresponsible disposal may harm the environment and humans. This is why it is imperative turpenoid is disposed of properly. This article goes over the proper disposal protocol for turpenoid and explains what should never be done to get rid of turpenoid. 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): How to Dispose of Turpenoid 

Are turpentine and turpenoid the same thing? 

No, turpenoid is an odorless white spirit that is used as a replacement for turpentine which has a strong odor. 

How do you get rid of turpenoid naturally? 

You can either hand over your used turpenoid to the local hazardous waste collection facility or mix it with cat litter at home, dry the litter and throw it out with the trash. 

How do you get rid of turpentine at home? 

Turpentine is toxic and flammable and should be handed over to the hazardous waste management facility in your area. 

Can you throw turpenoid down the sink? 

No, this is heavily discouraged. Turpenoid is derived from crude petroleum and can be potentially toxic to aquatic life. 

How do you dispose of turpentine oil? 

You hand it over to your local hazardous waste collection facility. If you have a small amount, you can mix it with cat litter, let the litter dry out completely in a well-ventilated room, and then throw it out with the trash. 

Does turpenoid evaporate at room temperature? 

Yes, however, it is far less toxic than turpentine and is much safer to work with. 

What can I do with turpenoid soaked rags? 

You can leave them to dry in a well-ventilated space, once they dry up you can throw them in the trash. 

Is turpenoid toxic? 

Turpenoid is far less toxic than turpentine, however, it is still toxic and you should always wear gloves when working with them. Turpenoid can cause contact dermatitis if it comes in contact with the skin. 

References: 

  1. Ruelas, G. (2022). How to Dispose of Turpenoid – How to Dispose of. Retrieved 11 February 2022, from https://howtodispose.info/dispose-turpenoid/#Dispose_of_Tupenoid_Using_Your_Citys_Waste_Management_Department
  2. White spirit – Wikipedia. (2022). Retrieved 11 February 2022, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_spirit#Types_and_grades
  3. Disposal of Used Turpenoid? – WetCanvas: Online Living for Artists. (2022). Retrieved 11 February 2022, from https://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/topic/disposal-of-used-turpenoid/
  4. (2022). Retrieved 11 February 2022, from https://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/materials_minerals_pdf/solvent.pdf
  5. (2022). Retrieved 11 February 2022, from https://www.rexart.com/media/turpenoid_natural.pdf
  6. How to recycle oil and white spirit medium for oil painting | Cass Art. (2022). Retrieved 11 February 2022, from https://www.cassart.co.uk/blog/how-to-recycle-oil-and-white-spirit-medium-for-oil-painting.htm
  7. Recycling Odorless Paint Thinner — California Academy of Painters. (2022). Retrieved 11 February 2022, from https://www.classart.org/new-page-1
  8. A safe place for paint waste. (2022). Retrieved 11 February 2022, from https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2004-apr-29-hm-safepaint29-story.html
  9. Odorless Turpenoid. (2022). Retrieved 11 February 2022, from http://www.weberart.com/odorless-turpenoid.html
  10. Understanding turpentine substitutes and turpenoid in oil painting. (2022). Retrieved 11 February 2022, from https://www.winsornewton.com/uk/education/guides/understanding-turpentine-substitutes-and-turpenoid-in-oil-painting/

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