How to Dispose of Rotten Eggs?

There’s absolutely nothing, I mean nothing that smells more putrid than a cracked rotten egg. It is the vile, fuming hydrogen sulfide in the eggs that give it its distinct rancid odor. The second you crack into it, its odor fills the kitchen walls, and all you can think of is how to get rid of this horrid thing. If you couldn’t tell, I am speaking from experience. A rotten egg tops the list of how awful a rotten food item can be. So let’s find out what to do with it. This article will take you through the dos and don’ts of rotten egg disposal.  

How to Dispose of Rotten Eggs?

Eggs are environmentally safe to be disposed of in the trash bin. Even if it is rotten, you can throw it in the garbage or wash it down the kitchen drain. You can also compost it if you have a compost bin or a community compost bin around your house. 

Throw it in the garbage: 

I am a staunch environmentalist, but when it comes to rotten eggs, I would recommend this approach above all else. If you already cracked the egg, throw the egg and the shells into a small plastic bag, then tie it up properly. Place the bag in the trash bin and take out the trash before trash pick-up.

Keep in mind that the smell of rotten eggs can be very overwhelming, you need to wrap and tie the bags properly to avoid the smell from leaking out. 

Wash it down the kitchen sink: 

Now, if the egg is cracked and you’re right near the kitchen sink, this is a viable option. Just turn the water on and pour the egg into the drain. Leave the water running for at least 2 minutes to make sure it’s washed down properly. If you have a garbage disposal you can use it. Just remember never to throw eggshells in the drain or the garbage disposal. It will clog up your pipes and may even block the garbage disposal. 

Keep in mind that the smell may linger for a while even if you leave the water running. You mustn’t keep the water running for too long since it is a scarce resource and we need to conserve it. If the odor is not too troublesome for you, you may try this approach. 

Compost it: 

If you have a garden compost bin, you can compost your rotten egg. Keep in mind the odor will likely be an issue. Even if you’re willing to deal with it, your neighbors may not. So here’s what you should do, bury the egg about 18 inches deep into your compost pile. This may help mask the smell. You can learn more about composting eggs here.

Conclusion:

There’s absolutely nothing, I mean nothing that smells more putrid than a cracked rotten egg. It is the vile, fuming hydrogen sulfide in the eggs that give it its distinct rancid odor. The second you crack into it, its odor fills the kitchen walls, and all you can think of is how to get rid of this horrid thing. If you couldn’t tell, I am speaking from experience. A rotten egg tops the list of how awful a rotten food item can be. This article takes you through the dos and don’ts of rotten egg disposal.  

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): How to Dispose of Rotten Eggs

How do I dispose of rotten eggs?

For intact eggs, you can throw them in the trash, after putting them in a bag and tying it up. For a broken egg, you can throw it in the trash, compost it, or pour the egg down the kitchen drain. Make sure you do not throw the shells into the drain. 

Can you dispose of eggs down the sink? 

Yes, you can. But do not throw the eggshells into the sink, it will surely clog your pipes. 

What can I do with bad eggs? 

The best thing to do is to throw them in the garbage.

Can you put eggs in food waste? 

Yes, you can. 

What kind of waste is eggshell? 

It’s biodegradable waste. 

Can you dispose of eggshells at your home? 

Yes, you can. You can compost the eggshells as an alternative to disposal. 

 

Is eggshell hazardous? 

No, it is not hazardous. It does, however, pile on with time. Composting eggshells is the best practice for eggshells.  

References: 

  1. Ruelas, G. (2022). How to Dispose of Eggs (3 Easy Ways) – How to Dispose of. Retrieved 14 February 2022, from https://howtodispose.info/dispose-eggs/
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  3. Choosing the Correct Bin. (2022). Retrieved 14 February 2022, from https://www.brandeis.edu/sustainability/waste/#!rc-cpage=295998
  4. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. (2022). Retrieved 14 February 2022, from https://www.co.washington.or.us/hhs/swr/reduce-reuse-recycle.cfm#!rc-cpage=95022
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  6. Garbage & Recycling | Harrisburg, NC. (2022). Retrieved 14 February 2022, from https://www.harrisburgnc.org/160/Garbage-Recycling#!rc-cpage=528260
  7. Disposal Recycle Guide – Waste Connections. (2022). Retrieved 14 February 2022, from https://www.wasteconnections.com/disposal-recycle-guide/#!rc-cpage=286784
  8. Recycling & Rubbish | West St. Paul, MN – Official Website. (2022). Retrieved 14 February 2022, from https://wspmn.gov/270/Recycling-Rubbish#!rc-cpage=242540
  9. Get Rid Of Eggs That Have Expired. (2022). Retrieved 14 February 2022, from http://com-bine.blogspot.com/2015/08/get-rid-of-eggs-that-have-expired.html
  10. Quick Answer: How Do You Dispose Of Raw Egg Yolks – SeniorCare2Share. (2022). Retrieved 14 February 2022, from https://www.seniorcare2share.com/how-do-you-dispose-of-raw-egg-yolks/

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