How to Dispose of Eggs?

Eggs are a staple in almost every pantry in the world. I remember even when I was a broke college student I’d have a carton of eggs in my fridge at all times. They are cheap, they are nutritious, they are fulfilling, eggs are just a godsend. Sometimes we do find ourselves with a few too many eggs in our fridge and the expiry date comes sooner than we can eat them. You may be confused as to what to do with them, let me explain what you can do with excess eggs in this article. 

How to Dispose of Eggs?


There are primarily four ways you can dispose of eggs: 

  • Donate if the eggs are still fresh
  • Throw them in the trash
  • Throw them in the garbage disposal 
  • Compost them

How to tell if an egg is still fresh: 

A bad egg will show signs that will tell you it’s past its expiry date. Eggs have a long shelf life and are good for at least three weeks after you pick them up from the supermarket. 

This is because eggs reach the supermarket aisle from the farm quite quickly, and they do not sit around in any warehouse for more than a day. Now depending on where you live you either refrigerate your eggs or keep them in a cold, dry place outside the fridge. 

You can tell if an egg is bad by the following ways, 

  • Sinking test- if the egg floats in water, it is no longer fresh
  • Sniff test- if the egg smells off do not eat it
  • Eye test- if it is slimy or powdery, it means either bacteria or mold is growing on it, do not eat it
  • Check against the light- if the air pocket in the egg is bigger than 1/8th of an inch, it is not fresh anymore.

You can find detailed explanations for these tests and their efficacies here.

In the United States, the eggs are thoroughly washed after they are collected from the farm, this removes a protective layer from the surface of the eggshell making the eggs susceptible to going bad at room temperature. Whereas in Europe, eggs are not washed thoroughly, so they can be kept outside at room temperature. 

Salmonella infections are quite common with egg consumption. The US and Europe implemented different strategies to minimize these infections. Europe regularly vaccinates its chickens and maintains a clean environment for the chickens to live, the United States cleans the eggs thoroughly. Both methods have shown a significant reduction in salmonella infections. 

If you end up with more eggs than you can finish and you are not sure if your eggs are still fresh, just perform the tests listed below to see if they are still good. If they are, and you still aren’t sure if you can finish them in time, don’t throw them away. 

Donate them instead: 

Try to see if there are any soup kitchens around you where you can donate your eggs. These kitchens will always appreciate your help. Just make sure the eggs are fresh before you hand them over. If you do end up with one or two bad ones during your inspection, you can throw them in a compost pile. 

Compost the eggs: 

If you cannot find a soup kitchen or a place to donate your eggs to, you can always throw them in your compost pile. Now, it is important to note that bad eggs have a  very rancid odor, and they can create very strong odors in a compost pile. 

If you have your garden compost bin, you can throw the eggs and eggshells into the compost bin. If some eggs are bad, you can bury them 18 inches deep into the pile to ensure the smell doesn’t escape. You can find out details of how you can compost eggs here

If you do not have a compost bin of your own, you can find a community composting center around your house that accepts eggs. Or you can ask any neighbor you have who may gladly take the eggs. 

Throw your eggs in the trash: 

If you cannot find anyone to take the eggs for composting either, then you’ll have to throw the eggs in the trash. If you have many eggs, you can take them out of the carton and throw them in the trash bag. Make sure to recycle your egg carton.

Throw your eggs in the kitchen sink: 

If you have one or two eggs, and you already broke one or two to test if they are still fresh. You can throw the eggs in the sink and wash them down with running water. Make sure you do not throw the eggs shells in the sink, these will clog the pipes. Even if you have a garbage disposal, you must not throw eggshells into it. This is because garbage disposals impale the food, not shred it. And the thin film under the shell may wrap around the impaler and clog the pipe. 

Conclusion: 

Eggs are a staple in almost every pantry in the world. I remember even when I was a broke college student I’d have a carton of eggs in my fridge at all times. They are cheap, they are nutritious, they are fulfilling, eggs are just a godsend. Sometimes we do find ourselves with a few too many eggs in our fridge and the expiry date comes sooner than we can eat them. If you are confused as to what to do with them, this article explains what you can do with excess eggs in this article. 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): How to Dispose of Eggs

How do I dispose of rotten eggs?

For intact eggs, you can throw them in the trash, after putting them in a bag and tying it up. For a broken egg, you can throw it in the trash, compost it, or pour the egg down the kitchen drain. Make sure you do not throw the shells into the drain. 

Can you dispose of eggs down the sink? 

Yes, you can. But do not throw the eggshells into the sink, it will surely clog your pipes. 

What can I do with bad eggs? 

The best thing to do is to throw them in the garbage.

Can you put eggs in food waste? 

Yes, you can. 

What kind of waste is eggshell? 

It’s biodegradable waste. 

Can you dispose of eggshells at your home? 

Yes, you can. You can compost the eggshells as an alternative to disposal. 

Is eggshell hazardous? 

No, it is not hazardous. It does, however, pile on with time. Composting eggshells is the best practice for eggshells.  

References: 

  1. Ruelas, G. (2022). How to Dispose of Eggs (3 Easy Ways) – How to Dispose of. Retrieved 14 February 2022, from https://howtodispose.info/dispose-eggs/
  2. Trash & Recycling | Thousand Oaks, CA. (2022). Retrieved 14 February 2022, from https://www.toaks.org/departments/public-works/sustainability/trash-recycling#!rc-cpage=268453
  3. Choosing the Correct Bin. (2022). Retrieved 14 February 2022, from https://www.brandeis.edu/sustainability/waste/#!rc-cpage=295998
  4. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. (2022). Retrieved 14 February 2022, from https://www.co.washington.or.us/hhs/swr/reduce-reuse-recycle.cfm#!rc-cpage=95022
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  8. Recycling & Rubbish | West St. Paul, MN – Official Website. (2022). Retrieved 14 February 2022, from https://wspmn.gov/270/Recycling-Rubbish#!rc-cpage=242540
  9. Get Rid Of Eggs That Have Expired. (2022). Retrieved 14 February 2022, from http://com-bine.blogspot.com/2015/08/get-rid-of-eggs-that-have-expired.html
  10. Quick Answer: How Do You Dispose Of Raw Egg Yolks – SeniorCare2Share. (2022). Retrieved 14 February 2022, from https://www.seniorcare2share.com/how-do-you-dispose-of-raw-egg-yolks/

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